Hungary and Poland pose worse threat to EU than Brexit

HUNGARY PARLIAMENTRonan McCrea argues that the crisis of trust between EU member states, and more notably between Hungary and Poland and the rest of the EU, is the biggest threat faced by the EU today.  This turmoil questions the core principle of mutual recognition among member states that is vital to the EU functioning. 

The Hungarian government forcibly retired judges and gave political figures greater control over the judiciary, while in Poland, the government has increased control of the judiciary.

Unforeseen and shocking political developments in another member state have placed Ireland at the centre of the biggest crisis facing the EU. No, I am not talking about Brexit but the breakdown of the rule of law in Hungary and, particularly Poland.

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Doris, cleaner to the chattering classes, back to school

Doris School

Doris cleaner to the chattering classes

A new UCL European Institute series of cartoons by Ros Asquith featuring Doris, a cleaning lady that witnesses the divides of a society shaken by Brexit. This series will be composed of a monthly cartoon shedding light on a particular issue around the British society and Brexit from July 2018 till the departure of the UK from the EU in March 2019.

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How could a second Brexit referendum be triggered?

parliamentWith ‘exit day’ less than six months away, public debate about a second Brexit vote continues. In this new post on this topic, Jess Sargeant, Alan Renwick and Meg Russell outline the key decision points and processes by which MPs or the government might choose to trigger a second referendum.

In our previous blogpost we considered how long it would take to hold a second referendum on Brexit, concluding that an extension to Article 50 would almost certainly be required. The length of the necessary extension would depend on when the referendum was triggered. Calling a referendum requires a majority in parliament, and whether such a majority exists will depend on political and circumstantial factors. But by examining the process of Brexit we can identify a number of key junctures at which a decision to hold a referendum could be made.

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Doris, cleaner to the chattering classes, and the summer holidays

ros cartoon august

Doris cleaner to the chattering classes

A new UCL European Institute series of cartoons by Ros Asquith featuring Doris, a cleaning lady that witnesses the divides of a society shaken by Brexit. This series will be composed of a monthly cartoon shedding light on a particular issue around the British society and Brexit from July 2018 till the departure of the UK from the EU in March 2019.

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The ICT Sector’s Brexit Priorities

2435823037_7c7598d137_o.jpgDr Elizabeth Lomas, Senior Lecturer in Information Governance at UCL, discusses some key steps to support the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector with regards to Brexit. Drawing on research from workshops and surveys, this post captures key actions and requirements for the sector. It makes the case that governments need to work more openly with ICT experts to ensure that laws are optimised for the sector and there are more targeted policies and funding strategies to support and grow ICT.

This blog is based on research exploring perspectives on the needs of those working across the information/ICT domain in order to respond positively to the changes triggered by Brexit. The work has been undertaken by Dr Elizabeth Lomas, UCL, and Professor Julie McLeod, Northumbria University. Data was gathered through two global surveys. The first was launched immediately after the Brexit referendum and obtained 733 responses, with 59% being made by UK citizens. The full results and analysis of this first survey are available here.  The second survey was launched one year after Article 50 was triggered in March 2018 and obtained 245 responses, again with 59% of responses coming from UK citizens. The surveys considered both the opportunities and threats posed by Brexit. In addition, two appreciative inquiry workshops were held, the first in Newcastle on 3rd May 2018 and the second in London on 26th June 2018. At each workshop there were participants who were from the UK and beyond. Appreciative inquiry is a strengths-based approach, intended to focus only on the potential positives for change.

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