EINotes and Briefing Papers

EINote 1: Pathways to EU Reform

Lenka Niederschuh and Christine Reh
March 2015, 5 pages

image-0001This factsheet discusses three main options for EU reform and the challenges associated with them in the current British and European context. It considers in particular:
• Option A – Reform of the EU’s Treaties
• Option B – Opt-outs and flexible opt-ins
• Option C – Policy change: adopting new legislation or changing existing laws

 

EINote 2: Britain and the European Convention on Human Rights

Eleni Frantziou and Dr Virginia Mantouvalou
May 2015, 5 pages

b-echr-noteThis fact sheet discusses the main debates relating to the application of the European Convention on Human Rights in the UK today. It considers in particular:
• The question of withdrawal from the Convention system and the creation of a British Bill of rights
• Ways of reforming the current institutional framework so as to achieve a smoother relationship between the ECHR and the UK

 

EINote 3: Brexit and Energy: Cost, Security and Climate Policy Implications

Michael Grubb and Stephen Tindale
May 2016, 5 pages

EInote3This paper analyses the implications of Brexit for the UK’s energy sector. Despite significant uncertainties, the experience of other non-EU countries and the UK’s past role in EU discussions allow broad predictions of the consequences for UK energy operations and trade.

 

 

EINote 4: A Short Handbook of Brexit Fallacies

Albert Weale
June 2016, 5 pages

This paper analyses how in the EU referendum campaign, facts needed to be fitted into a bigger picture to allow individuals to make responsible voting choices. Deciding to leave or remain in the EU required estimating the possible consequences of the choice. Estimating consequences requires a chain of reasoning. And reasoning always involves the danger of fallacies. Fallacies can lead even thoughtful people from factual truths to false conclusions. This note explores the role fallacies played in the debate in five keys areas: the economy, regulation, migration, sovereignty and security.

Briefing Paper: The Constitutional Consequences of Brexit: Whitehall and Westminster

Nicholas Wright and Oliver Patel
June 2016, 5 pages

BRIEFING1This paper focuses on the potential impact of Brexit upon Whitehall and Westminster. It asks:
– What would be the immediate consequences of a vote to leave the EU?
– How would the process of withdrawal affect Whitehall and Westminster?
– How would Whitehall and Westminster change in the long term after withdrawal?

 

Briefing Paper: Brexit: The Consequences for Devolution and the Union

Robert Hazell and Alan Renwick
June 2016, 5 pages

BRIEFING3This paper discusses the consequences of Brexit for Devolution and the Union. It suggests that:
– With public opinion more pro-EU in Scotland and Northern Ireland, the referendum result could be dividing and divisive.
– The process of withdrawal could be complicated by devolution and have profound constitutional implications for the Union.
– In the long-term, it could increase the scope for policy implications between the nations, and for differentiated relationships with the EU.

 

Briefing Paper: Brexit: The Consequences for Devolution and the Union

Robert Hazell and Alan Renwick
June 2016, 5 pages

BRIEFING3This paper discusses the consequences of Brexit for Devolution and the Union. It suggests that:
– With public opinion more pro-EU in Scotland and Northern Ireland, the referendum result could be dividing and divisive.
– The process of withdrawal could be complicated by devolution and have profound constitutional implications for the Union.
– In the long-term, it could increase the scope for policy implications between the nations, and for differentiated relationships with the EU.

 

Briefing Paper: Brexit: The Consequences for Other EU Member States

Oliver Patel and Alan Renwick
June 2016, 5 pages

BRIEFING4This paper focuses on the political and constitutional implications of Brexit for other EU member states. It indicates:
– The importance of states’ domestic politics and economic considerations in negotiation stances
– Brexit could embolden Eurosceptic movements, leading to calls for similar referendums and possibly the unravelling of the EU.
– Brexit would alter member states’ relative strength within the EU.
– Ireland would be particularly affected, economically and with regard to the re-introduction of border controls.

One thought on “EINotes and Briefing Papers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s